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During the Height of Football, Why March Matters (for a Vasectomy)

February 09, 2022 | By: Dr. Aaron Bey

Yes, February has been all about football in Cincinnati (Who Dey!). However, there’s a medical reason to start thinking ahead to March.

The recovery period for a vasectomy is typically less than a week. The Final Four games of March Madness© are played in three days. The opportunity to watch the games at home while recovering – that depends on your timing.

Meet March Madness’s unusual, opportunistic cousin, Vas Madness – a national movement in which men undergo the family-planning procedure in time to recover in front of the screen, as 68 college basketball teams compete for the national title. Scheduling your vasectomy appointment in time for the games should take just a few minutes. But don’t wait until the last minute; appointments could go fast.

Each year, many of the more than 500,000 vasectomies performed are scheduled for March. Some reports indicate a 30% increase in procedures during the first week of March Madness, this year March 13 – 19.

This isn’t the time to free throw. Vas Madness, like March Madness, requires a little strategy.

Warmup: 6 Vasectomy Prep Facts

Proper vasectomy planning extends beyond making an early appointment – as should any medical procedure. If you or a loved one have scheduled a vasectomy, here are some helpful facts to prepare for a more comfortable, successful recovery.

  • Clean up beforehand.  Ensure  there are plenty of clean  (tight) underwear on hand. And be prepared to manscape – the doctor will likely advise to shave or cut pubic hair.
  • You must rest and avoid sports (except from the sidelines). A vasectomy takes just 30 minutes to perform, but clipping those vas deferens (the tubes that transport semen) will cause swelling and there is a risk of swelling. The patient will need full rest for 24 hours and return to light activity in two to three days. No exercise, sexual intercourse, or heavy lifting for five days – the heaviest lifting should involve a bag of frozen peas to the scrotum.
  • There may be blood. A common side effect of a vasectomy is blood in the semen. Patients should avoid aspirin and blood thinners, including ibuprofen (Motrin and Advil     ) and naproxen (Aleve), for seven days before the procedure as well as after. Stick with Tylenol.
  • Results are not immediate! Some viable sperm remain in the semen after a vasectomy, and it can take up to 20 ejaculations, or two to three months, to clear it from the body. Men who have sexual intercourse within this timeframe should use another form of birth control until a doctor confirms sperm are no longer present.
  • Yes, you’ll still be up for sex. A man does not require viable semen for a healthy sexual desire or to perform. In fact,  his masculinity will remain intact. (FYI: The testes even continue to produce sperm, but it is safely absorbed by the body.)
  • It may be covered by insurance. A vasectomy can cost five times less than a tubal ligation (a woman’s sterilization procedure), and it may be covered by health insurance. Candidates should check with their insurance providers to be clear of coverage and ask their urologist about the cost.

Schedule Now…Before Selections Run Out!

Perhaps the most important fact regarding vasectomy recovery is it introduces the patient and his loved one to a lifestyle free of reproduction concerns. The procedure is 99.99% effective, and research indicates there are no serious long-term health risks.

So schedule an appointment now, while they are still available. Selection Sunday is March 13.

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